HNJH

2017-10-19 - 2019-10-31 Community Dinner

2018-01-15 - 2025-01-15 Tahquamenon Friends of the Library

2018-01-29 - 2025-01-29 Luce County Parks & Recreation Board Meeting

2018-01-29 - 2021-01-29 Parkinson's Support Group

2018-01-29 - 2025-01-29 Luce-West Mackinac County Fair Board Meeting

2018-01-29 - 2025-01-29 Alzheimer Caregivers Support Group

2018-01-29 - 2025-01-29 First Baptist Baby Pantry

2018-01-29 - 2025-01-29 First Baptist Baby Pantry

2018-01-30 - 2025-01-30 Great Lakes Recovery Center Peer Support Services

2018-02-01 - 2025-02-01 T.O.P.S. Meeting

2018-02-01 - 2025-02-01 Newberry American Legion Euchre

2018-02-05 - 2025-02-05 Lions Club Meeting

2018-02-05 - 2025-02-05 Lions Club Meeting

2018-02-06 - 2025-02-06 Luce County Parks and Recreation Department Board Meeting

2018-02-07 - 2025-02-07 Newberry Ambassadors Meeting

2018-02-08 - 2025-02-08 American Legion Post 74 Meeting

2018-02-08 - 2025-02-08 Tahquamenon Area Senior Citizens Meeting

2018-02-14 - 2025-02-14 Library Advisory Board

2018-03-19 - 2020-03-19 Village Council Meeting

2018-11-19 - 2020-11-19 Blood Drive

2019-04-18 Michigan Work's Job Fair

2019-04-22 - 2019-06-06 Wet and Wild: A Helga Flower Gallery Exhibit

2019-04-27 TLC Spa Day

2019-05-02 - 2019-05-05 North of 45 Writer's Retreat

2019-05-18 - 2019-05-19 Murder Mystery Dinner

2019-05-21 Newberry Storm Spotter Training 2019

2019-05-25 - 2019-09-28 Lumberjack Breakfast

2019-05-26 Lumberjack Breakfast

2019-06-03 - 2019-06-07 Loosen Up with Confidence Helga Flower Workshop

2019-06-19 Open Mic Night with John Latini

2019-06-22 Two Hearted Trail Run

2019-06-26 - 2019-06-27 The Rough & Tumble at Chamberlin's

2019-06-26 MIP presents Key Change

2019-06-27 - 2019-06-30 ECA presents Seussical the Musical

2019-06-30 ECA presents Seussical the Musical

2019-06-30 Fireworks Fundraiser Golf Tournament

2019-07-03 MIP presents Martin Koop and Joshua Ott

2019-07-06 ECA presents the Marquette City Band

2019-07-10 MIP presents Ryan Shadbolt and the Weathermen

2019-07-13 Hike the River Mouth Trail

2019-07-17 MIP presents Seven Bridges

2019-07-20 Boogie, Beehives & Beyond!

2019-07-24 MIP presents Side Trak'd Detroit

2019-07-27 Wine & Cheese Tasting & Auction Fundraiser

2019-07-27 Lumberjack Breakfast

2019-07-31 MIP presents Banned

2019-08-03 2nd Annual 906 Festival

2019-08-03 2nd Annual 906 Festival

2019-08-05 The True North Quartet Chamber Music Concert

2019-08-07 MIP presents The Floyd Brothers Band

2019-08-10 Tahqua Trail Run

2019-08-10 Two Hearted Two Step

2019-08-14 - 2019-08-15 Follywood!

2019-08-21 MIP presents The Troy Graham Band

2019-08-22 The Best of Russia and France Classical Concert

2019-08-25 Lumberjack Breakfast

2019-09-14 ECA presents Joshua Davis

2019-10-19 Under the Harvest Moon Dinner Dance

Newberry The Official Moose Capital of Michigan

Many people do not realize that part of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is home to a free-ranging moose herd. Although it is difficult to predict where moose might be seen on any given day, there are areas where visitors would do well to begin their quest.  In the eastern Upper Peninsula, Tahquamenon Falls State Park and Seney National Wildlife Refuge offer the best chances of seeing moose.   Video taken in September of 2009, by Nate Crosslin (4 miles north of Newberry).
Stop at the visitor center on the corner of M-28 and M-123 in Newberry to get a copy of Moose Country, a DNR guide. This guide is designed to help visitors locate occupied moose habitat and has maps of the two moose viewing areas mentioned above.
Some of the routes listed in the guide are on rugged seasonal roads that may become impassible any time of the year.  Look for moose in the early morning and evening, when summer temperatures are coolest.

Moose often are associated with water, so areas around beaver ponds and along the edges of lakes, streams, and swamps are good places to look. Tahquamenon Falls State Park has a moose information center with interpretive materials including a kiosk and a video on Michigan moose recovery efforts. Interpretive staff can provide the latest information on the local herd and recent sightings. In addition to moose, loons, eagles, black bears, deer, foxes, and even wolves may be seen in moose country.
Hiking trails ramble throughout the state parks, connecting several scenic overlooks. Seney National Wildlife Refuge has a seven-mile marshland wildlife drive open to vehicles during daylight hours, plus a visitor center and gift shop.

Caution must be taken when watching moose. Moose should not be approached. They can be unpredictable and aggressive. Most dangerous are cow moose with young, or bulls during the mating season (September and October).

Information taken from The Michigan Department of Natural Resources website: www.michigandnr.com

More Michigan Moose Information


Moose are built for cold weather;  with less surface area than smaller animals it is easier to maintain their core temperature. Their long legs make it easier to move through heavy snow and their heavy coats help them withstand cold temperatures.

Moose are native to Michigan.  Early settlers hunted moose for food.  By the 1880's moose were not found in the Lower Peninsula, and by 1889 they were given full protection by the state.  Gradually moose disappeared from the Upper Peninsula as well.  In the 1930's the moose population of Isle Royale, in  the northwest corner of Lake Superior, was overpopulated.  The Michigan Department of Conservation decided to trap-and-transfer 71 moose, 63 of which were released in the Upper Peninsula. Moose were sighted more often, until WWII and meat rationing took place.  From the 1950's-1970's occassional moose were spotted in the UP.   In 1985, 29 moose were moved from Ontario to the western U.P.  One of these bull moose found his way north of Newberry.  
In 1987, 30 more moose were brought over from Ontario.  The  western U.P. moose population is now estimated at around 420 animals, and growing about 10% a year.  The overall moose population in the U.P. is estimated at around 700.

Moose are cold weather animals.  Even in the winter, when the temperature gets above 23F, the moose will seek shade.  Lake Superior's cooling effect is important for the moose population.

In 2010 a bill was introduced in the Michigan senate to establish an annual moose hunting season in the U.P., however currently no moose hunting is allowed.

Information From:  
Gwizdz, Bob. "Future Is Uncertain for U.P. Moose Herd." Michigan Outdoor News 12 Feb. 2010: 11+,       
Skinner, Victor. "Moose Hunting Bill Introduced." Michigan Outdoor News 12 Feb. 2010: 1+.